Site icon Benni De Jagere

A (Possible) Communication Plan for Data Platform Events

Wall of Text, Incoming!

The last few years, I have been one of the lucky volunteers to handle outbound communications with speakers and attendees for our event, dataMinds Connect. I am a stickler for communication, so I try to have our team put a lot of effort into this.
When all was said and done after the events, it has been wonderful to receive compliments about it.

I’ve also had a few people reach out to us, to ask for our ‘communication plan’. It has never been more than a few bullet points jotted down into a shared OneNote, so I decided that now is as good as time as any to write it out a bit more detailed.
Do keep in mind that this is a theoretical plan, and we would have a very boring community if everything always went according to plan . For obvious reasons, I’ve left out some of the more private details specific to our event.

With PASS dissolving soon, I think there will be more events that need to figure out what to do. With this, I hope to reach other organisers in our Data Platform space, and have it be of some value to them. Likely, a lot of this can be reused for Tech event outside our Data Platform space, but I have no practical experience do back up that statement.

You will never see/hear us claim that is ‘the golden way’ of doing things, and that everyone should follow our example. This is a compilation of some of the things we have done in the past, and reiterated on over the years, specific to our events. And yes, we have had mistakes in the past, that needed to be improved on, that is just how things go.

It is more than likely, that you are will need to tailor specific parts of this to you own requirements, or add some things for your own event.

But as always, if you have some questions or remarks, do not hesitate to reach out.

Who are the stakeholders?

To me, there are 4 main groups of stakeholders for our outbound communication, and 1 group with ‘others’. Each one of these groups has their own need for information, with a timing attached to it as to when they need to receive this.

Main groups :

“Other” group, really depends on what event you’re running :

What do we send to whom?

I won’t lie, for dataMinds Connect we work together with an external partner (Sidekick), to help us write the communications to attendees, and do some of the graphical/visual stuff for us. I think there’s a big difference in communicating in an informative way to speakers, volunteers, and partners, as to trying to convince attendees to join your (paid) event. For that specific reason, we get people to help us.

Throughout the years, I’ve found that sending communications to all the groups, except attendees, works best if you send them short bullet points with actions needed, or something they have to read. Then, if they want more details, they can always read the more descriptive version below.
I’m aware that I have a tendency for Walls of Text (this post is Exhibit ZZZ514), which often leads to parts being neglected or not read at all.

Mind you, just because your message is clear and concise, this does not mean everyone will read (and respond to it). Cat herding is a large part of organising events, so you need to prepare yourself for it

How do we contact these groups?

For us, we’re using a mixed approach. All communications with attendees happen through MailChimp, with specific segments for the audiences we’re targeting, as we’ve built up an extensive attendee mailing list in our 14 years of existence.
When communicating with volunteers, partners and/or speakers, it happens through plain old e-mails, sent from our personal dataMinds accounts.

When do we need to send them the relevant information?

Again, this really varies for the event you’re planning, if it’s online/in-person, ..
I still base myself on in-person events mostly, as that is what I hope to return to over the course of the next year.

When I’m referring to dates, I’ll refer to them as “T-x”. You don’t have to agree with the timings, these are just the numbers I have in my head. Whether we actually achieve those dates, I’ll graciously leave in the middle.
For example:

At a glance

For your convenience, I put everything into a single table to get an overview. You can use the subjects with links to navigate to that specific segment.

Target Group Subject When
Speakers Call for Speakers Open T-210
Speakers Reminder : Call for Speaker open T-115
Speakers Session Selection T-100
Speakers Reminder : Session Selection T-90
Speakers Speaker Update 1 T-60
Speakers Precon Speakers – Room requirements T-30
Speakers Speaker Update 2 T-10
Speakers Thank you T+1
Speakers Reminder : Session Materials T+5
Speakers Session Feedback T+10
Partners Call for Partners Open (+ Call for Speakers) T-210
Partners Reminder : Call for Partner open T-120
Partners Partner Update 1 T-60
Partners Partner Update 2 T-10
Partners Thank you & Raffle Winners T+1
Volunteers Call for Volunteers Open T-30
Volunteers Practical info T-10
Volunteers Thank you T+1
Attendees Announcement (Date + CfS) T-210
Attendees Schedule T-80
Attendees Highlight (Tracks, Newcomers, Speakers, Keynote, ..) T-80..-7
Attendees Final Update T-2
Attendees Thank you T+1
Attendees Session Materials T+5

Speaker Communications

Call for Speakers

Before you launch your Call for Speakers, there are a few things you should consider. In general, it’s a lot easier to get information from people, when they’re submitting to your event, rather than when they’re selected and they need to respond back in an e-mail to you.

Some of the things to consider, for online and/or in-person events

The list will need to altered, depending on the specifics of your event. In any case, try to think about as many of these things as possible, to get all the information you need, as soon as you can.

Our Call for Speakers for an in-person event usually ends about a bit more than 3 months prior to the event. Specifically, to allow speakers to plan their travel when ticket prices aren’t through the roof yet. For a virtual event, you can move back the selection date about a month and a half. That is still a long time yes, but there are some speakers out there that submit new sessions, and starting tweaking them as soon as they get selected.

Call for Speakers opened (T-210)

When your Call for Speakers is ready to be released into the wild, that’s when you send out a short e-mail to your speaker list to inform them about it. My expectation is that we won’t be seeing in-person events in the next 4 – 5 months, but I’ll still discuss the options for in-person and online events.

We typically include :

Additionally, there’s new community initiatives popping up, like the Call for Data Speakers by Daniel Hutmacher. Sessionize is a popular option for Call for Speakers, and they’ve recently introduced a discovery system for speakers and events.
These are quick no-brainers to get some extra reach on your Call for Speakers.

With about two weeks left on the Call for Speakers, it might be a good thing to specifically target a few speakers that have submitted/presented before, but have yet to do so on this Call for Speakers.

Session Selection (T-100)

When your Call for Speakers is closed, it’s really important to send out selection feedback as soon as possible, to respect the time other people put into it. In the past, we’ve had our selection meetings 3-5 days after the Call for Speakers was closed. Everyone prepares in their own way, but I try to have gone through all the abstracts, and define my personal lists of sessions I’d like to select.

When sending out the selection feedback, thank the people for the time they’ve taken to submit, and that they can always request feedback on the specifics of your decision. And please, whatever you do, send out a message to every speaker that submitted, so they know their session was not accepted.

Speakers that get selected will get more information in the following Speaker Updates. How many you send, and when varies mostly on the input you need, and what you need to inform your speakers about. We tend to keep it to two, unless there’s other input we need to send out.

It does make sense to inform speakers if you’re planning on hosting a pre/post event extracurricular activity (ie. Speaker Dinner, Guided Trip/Tour, ..), to accommodate their planning.
Most likely, you will have to chase down a few speakers to get confirmation that they will present at your event.

Especially for online events, it really pays off to send out a personalised calendar invite to your speakers, with the information for their session. Yes, it does take some time, but it drastically reduces communication mishaps due to timezones, dates, overlaps in their own schedule, ..

Speaker Update 1 (T-60)

Your event is still a long way off, but it does pay off to inform well ahead of time. If you’ve informed about the important topics in your Call for Speakers briefing, this is mostly a repeat.

Precon Speakers – Rider (T-30)

When having precon sessions planned, it’s interesting to ask your precon speakers for any specifics they need/want to have their room set up. Some speakers like a classroom, or U-style for the tables/chairs, some would like flipcharts and whiteboard markers to be their. Some would to have an ice cold beer delivered to them at 3PM in the afternoon. Whatever it is that helps your precon speakers present their session in an optimal way, is good to discuss this with them up front, so your venue is aware of this.

Final Speaker Update (T-10)

This is your final update for your speakers, and now it’s mostly reiterating what they’ve been told a few times

Thank you + Reminder for Session Materials (T+1)

The day after your event, it’s time to explicitly thank your speakers for their participation in your event. You’ve probably already done this directly after their session, but it won’t hurt to do it again.

Session Feedback (T+10)

To close off communications to your speakers, send out a brief update on the session feedback received for their session, and how many attendees were in their session.

Optionally, you can include the link to the collected session materials. Speakers will most likely have attended other sessions as well.

Partner Communications

Call for Partners opened (T-210)

You’re contacting partners in order to secure funding for your event. Typically, this needs be budgeted on their end before they can commit to anything. Having a recurring event makes this a bit easier, as you’ll have recurring partners too. Finding new partners will be a lot easier if it’s well ahead of your event.

Your main point of update will be your event prospectus (or partner file), to inform potential partners on the options that are available, at which costs.

And yes, you’ll most likely have to send out a few reminders to get people to respond.

Partner Update 1 (T-60)

Similar to the Speaker Updates, you’ll want to inform your partners about any specifics on your event platform, (online) expo hall, attendee raflle, and any particular things you may have. Partners will need time to prepare something on their end, and it’s possible your event is not the only one they’re participating in.

For example, we gave our partners the option to display a ‘commercial’ video during the breaks in our online event. A video like this has to be prepared or fine tuned.

Outlining once more how partners will be able to interact with attendees, how they gain attendee contact details with respect for GDPR, these are all specifics they need to be aware of, well ahead of the event. Usually, it’s also a good idea to have partners inform you of the raffle prizes they’re planning on handing out.

Partner Update 2  – Final Update(T-10)

This is your final update for partners, where you give them all the practical details needed for the event itself.

Thank you & Raffle Winners (T+1)

Partners provide you with funding for your event, as you likely cannot cover everything with attendee tickets alone. Meaning, they play a very big role in the longevity of your event. Explicitly thank your partners, and send over the contact details of attendees that opted in, and their raffle prize winner as soon as you can after the event.

This will help your partners close off the administration on their end sooner as well, and they’ll be ever so grateful for it.

Volunteer Communications

Call for Volunteers opened (T-30)

Most likely, you’ll need volunteers for a wide range of tasks in your event. Be it moderating online sessions, staffing the reception booth at your in-person event, room monitoring, .. There’s always plenty of things that need to be done, and more hands definitely makes this a lighter task.

When opening up a Call of Volunteers, you can decide to go the private route by contacting people you know, or you can set up a public call. Both have their pros and cons, but I feel a combination of both works best. You have your ‘regulars’, that know their way around, and some fresh blood coming in as well.

Describe the different tasks you have, how many people you need, and when they need to be executed. This way, people can sign up for the tasks that interest them.

Practical Information (T-10)

Brief your volunteers with :

I once saw the volunteer briefing Data Saturday Holland sends out to their volunteers, and I was quite impressed with that.

Thank you (T+1)

Your volunteers have put in their personal time, to help make your event a success. The least you can do, is send them a heartfelt thank you.

Attendee Communications

Event Announcement + CfS opened (T-210)

Inform your prior attendees, and/or mailing list that your event will take place, and that the Call for Speakers has been opened up. It’s always nice to have some of your local attendees step up to the Call for Speakers, so they’ll definitely benefit from being informed early on.

Schedule Announcement + Registration opened(T-80)

To officially open your registrations, it pairs nicely with the announcement of your event schedule, or some names for precon sessions. Most people only decide to attend a specific event when they know who will be presenting. Thus, having this information available as soon as possible, can definitely benefit you.

Especially when you have a paid event, some attendees have to ask permission and/or funding from their employer. This can take some time, so it pays off to give them all the time you can.

Highlights (T-80 to T-7)

Depending on the specifics of your event, you’ll want to spark interest in some of the things you have to offer. Convincing people to attend your event usually takes a few tries. For your event, it helps to define some things you want to highlight, and then create a schedule for this.

Some examples:

Written down very simplistic, and exactly the reason why we have someone help us. Some examples here and here.

Final Update (T-2)

As we updated our partners, speakers and volunteers of the final practical details, the attendees should get similar information.

This is where you inform your attendees about:

Thank you (T+1)

Specifically thank your attendees for attending, and inform them of what they can expect in the coming time.

Session Materials (T+5)

It’s possible not all the session materials have been uploaded so far, but it is important to allow attendees to review the materials they’ve seen at your event. By sending out a part of the materials you have, attendees can already start their process. Then mention that more content will be added as we move along.

To conclude

A long article, I know .. Yet, I hope it can prove of use to anyone putting on a Data Platform in the near future.
Good luck on your endeavours!

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